Last edited by Voodoorn
Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Mitchell"s Fold stone circle and its folklore found in the catalog.

Mitchell"s Fold stone circle and its folklore

L. V. Grinsell

Mitchell"s Fold stone circle and its folklore

by L. V. Grinsell

  • 150 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Toucan in St. Peter Port .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Folklore -- England -- Shropshire.,
  • Mitchell"s Fold (England)

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby L.V. Grinsell.
    SeriesWest Country folklore -- no.15
    The Physical Object
    Pagination15p. :
    Number of Pages15
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL20063876M
    ISBN 100856942189

    Mitchell's Fold Stone Circle is located in Minsterley. Plan your visit to Mitchell's Fold Stone Circle and a wealth of other attractions, well-known and undiscovered, using our .   One such place is Mitchell’s Fold, a Bronze Age stone circle. This bleakly sited monument comes with a strange legend attached – the tale of a wicked witch and a fairy cow. And s o one December day Nosy Writer and the Team Leader set off to explore.

    Sunset over Mitchell's Fold stone circle, Stapeley Hill, Shropshire. Blog. A celebration of beautiful Shropshire. It’s been an excellent few days in the life of our new book, Shropshire From Dawn to Dusk. Published: 11 th July Modified: 11 th July Read more. Triumph of the Clun Green Man. Tradition and folklore surround the Clun. Mitchells Fold Stone Circle. Many prehistoric sites are associated with myth and folklore and there is a popular tale of how Mitchell’s fold got its name. There was once a white cow which provided a limitless supply of milk for the local inhabitants. So long as each only .

      The foggy moors and ancient stone buildings just add to the atmosphere of her ghostly tale. This book would work well for discussions of Welsh history and folklore in general. However, its slow pace and other problems will mar its power in a group reading. Possibly a read aloud would work better. Why 3 stars?:Reviews: Mitchell’s Fold Today, Mitchell’s Fold is the remains of a stone circle standing on a bleak heath in South West Shropshire.A local folktale tells of how the stone circle was originated. It tells that there was once a time of great and grievous famine that fell upon the country thereabouts.


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Mitchell"s Fold stone circle and its folklore by L. V. Grinsell Download PDF EPUB FB2

Mitchell's Fold (Stone Circle) on The Modern Antiquarian, the UK & Ireland's most popular megalithic community website. images, 6 fieldnotes, 3 pieces of folklore, 2 weblinks, plus information on many more ancient sites nearby and across the UK & Ireland. Grinsell, L, Mitchell’s Fold Stone Circle and its Folklore (St Peter Port, Guernsey, ) Note.

The text on this page is derived from the Heritage Unlocked series of guidebooks, published in –6. We intend to update and enhance the content as soon as possible to provide more information on the property and its. PHILIP DAVIES tells of us the mystery surrounding the Bronze Age monument, Mitchell’s Fold Circle in Shropshire Stone circles are an ever present part of the British countryside.

The most famous of these is of course Stonehenge in Salisbury, but there are plenty of other stone circles. Mitchell's Fold Stone Circle Mitchell's Fold in South Shropshire is a Bronze Age stone circle dating back to BC (making it older than Stonehenge) and it lies on one of the mystical ley lines.

We still do not fully understand why stone circles were built, but it. Mitchell's Fold Stone Circle is a bronze age ritual or ceremonial site that is approximately 80 feet in diameter and is thought to have been made from up to 30 stones.

The stones are dolerite and come from Stapeley Hill, just a short distance away. The book is full of hints of Norse Mythology, old stone circles, pagan rituals plus a baby abduction and of course murder mixed with a few red herrings.

In parts really gripping and in others very sad. A good mystery set in Norfolk not too far from where I live.

The down side for me is the continuing saga of Ruth and s:   My early-evening trip to Mitchell’s Fold Stone Circle was one I had not planned for, even though I’d circled its location on my Ordnance Survey map.

A day earlier, on the drive south from Welshpool, I’d passed the road sign for a “stone circle” and, without a post code (or 3G signal) for my SatNav to lead the way, I put my faith in my. Mitchell's Fold Stone Circle is located on Stapeley Hill, a dramatic location that makes a great place for a bracing walk across the moorland.

The unforgettably picturesque Stokesay Castle is about 13 miles away. It is the finest and best-preserved medieval fortified manor house in England. Local folklore also suggests that King Arthur drew Excalibur from one of the stones here to become King of the Britons.

Like most stone circles, Mitchell's Fold was probably used for some Bronze Age ritual or ceremonial For more information visit the Mitchell's Fold Stone Circle website. Mitchell's Fold (sometimes called Medgel's Fold) is a Bronze Age stone circle in South-West Shropshire, located on dry heathland at the south-west end of Stapeley Hill, in the civil parish of Chirbury with Brompton, at a height of ft (m).

As with most sites of this type, its true history is unknown. Mitchell's Fold submitted by baz Mitchells Fold Stone Circle,nr Priestweston,Shrops.(SO) Perched on a flat shelf between Corndon Hill to the south and Stapeley Hill to the north-east, Mitchells Fold offers panoramic views towards Wales to the west.

About thirteen stones remain from. Mitchell’s Fold in my heart. Sitting at the edge of the circle it took little imagination to see the significance of the location, and imagine how the landscape would have looked when the circle was erected, over years ago.

Mitchells’ Fold Stone circle earned its place in my heart that day. Mitchell's Fold (sometimes called Medgel's Fold or Madges Pinfold) is a Bronze Age stone circle in southwest Shropshire, located near the small village of White Grit on dry heathland at the southwest end of Stapeley Hill in the civil parish of Chirbury with Brompton, at a height of ft (m) o.d.

The stone circle, a standing stone, and a cairn comprise a Scheduled Ancient Monument; the Coordinates: 52°34′43″N 3°01′34″W /. One of those wild and mystical places is Mitchell’s Fold stone circle in Shropshire. Mitchell’s Fold Stone Circle.

There are 15 stones laid out in a circle. Some small; some big. English Heritage (who manage the site) say that there could have been as many as thirty stones at one time.

Mitchell's Fold (sometimes called Medgel's Fold) is a Bronze Age stone circle in South-West Shropshire, located on dry heathland at the south-west end of Stapeley Hill. As with most sites of this type, its true history is unknown. The name of the circle may derive from 'micel' or 'mycel', Old English for 'big', referring to the size of this large circle.

Known locally as Mitchell’s Fold, it is one of several Stone Circles which stood in this district, once upon a time. Or so the story goes. Ninety feet in diameter, the Circle’s largest stone monolith being just six feet tall. This modest but evocative monument dates back, according to the history books, to Neolithic times; an incredible 3, years old.

Mitchell's Fold (sometimes called Medgel's Fold or Madges Pinfold) is a Bronze Age stone circle in southwest Shropshire, located near the small village of White Grit on dry heathland at the southwest end of Stapeley Hill in the civil parish of Chirbury with Brompton, at a height of ft (m) o.d.

It is a Scheduled Ancient Monument (number ) in the guardianship of English nates: 52°34′43″N 3°01′34″W /. Prehistoric Bronze Age stone circle 85 feet in diameter, consisting originally of some 30 stones of which 15 are now visible.

Stone circles attract more fascination than any other ancient monument. Shropshire's best example is at Mitchell's Fold, near Chirbury. Folklore tells of a magic cow that provided milk for all, until one day a witch drained her dry.

The cow vanished forthwith, and according to the legend, the witch was turned into the central stone and the circle erected to keep her in.

The stones are likely to have been erected by farming community for a ritual or religious purpose. Mitchell's Fold (sometimes called Medgel's Fold or Madges Pinfold) is a Bronze Age stone circle in south-western Shropshire, found near the small village of White Grit on dry heathland at the south-west end of Stapeley Hill, at a height of 1, feet above sea level.

The circle is a Scheduled Ancient Monument in the guardianship of English Heritage. Mitchell's fold stone circle is a nice little afternoon out. To see something that was constructed over years ago is amazing. Best of all its free to visit and there are /5(26).

Apparently there used to be three circles in the area, but now just two survive, and Mitchell's Fold is the best-known. And as you'd expect, there's a legend of how the stone circle.

The Hoarstones stone circle, north from Mitchell's Fold also has an alignment with The Stiperstones, and the probably lost circle (or cairn) at Shelve, immediately west, is not far away at all. To the north east, The Wrekin can be seen, and to the east Caer Caradoc's summit (Church Stretton) is noticeable, across the stretch of The Long Mynd.