Last edited by Grogor
Sunday, August 9, 2020 | History

5 edition of The Economy and Material Culture of Slaves found in the catalog.

The Economy and Material Culture of Slaves

Roderick A. McDonald

The Economy and Material Culture of Slaves

Goods and Chattels on the Sugar Plantations of Jamaica and Louisiana

by Roderick A. McDonald

  • 27 Want to read
  • 4 Currently reading

Published by Louisiana State University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slavery & emancipation,
  • Social History,
  • Slavery,
  • Archaeology / Anthropology,
  • History: American,
  • Jamaica,
  • Louisiana,
  • Anthropology - Cultural,
  • History,
  • Sugar trade

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages400
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7945532M
    ISBN 100807117943
    ISBN 109780807117941

    The slave auctioneer’s bell and the church-going bell chime in with each other, and the bitter cries of the heart-broken slave are drowned in the religious shouts of his pious master. Revivals of religion and revivals in the slave-trade go hand in hand together. The slave . - slavery surely impacts the economy because of all the money the plantations earnwith the help of slaves and cash crops - politically, slavery is a very heated topic that separates the parties and most people chose a side, no one was ever in between.

    Southern culture valued a behavioral code in which men’s honor, based on the domination of others and the protection of southern white womanhood, stood as the highest good. Slavery also decreased class tensions, binding whites together on the basis of race despite their inequalities of wealth.   In the same year, the nearly 4 million American slaves were worth some $ billion, making them the largest single financial asset in the entire U.S. economy Author: Ta-Nehisi Coates.

      About the Book. Following her bestselling Life Along the Silk Road, Susan Whitfield widens her exploration of the great cultural highway with a new captivating portrait focusing on material , Slaves, and Stupas tells the stories of ten very different objects, considering their interaction with the peoples and cultures of the Silk Road—those who made them, carried them, received.   The slave economy of the southern states had ripple effects throughout the entire US economy, with plenty of merchants in New York City, Boston, and elsewhere helping to Author: HBS Working Knowledge.


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The Economy and Material Culture of Slaves by Roderick A. McDonald Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Economy and Material Culture of Slaves: Goods and Chattels on the Sugar Plantations of Jamaica and Louisiana [McDonald, Roderick A.] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The Economy and Material Culture of Slaves: Goods and Chattels on the Sugar Plantations of Jamaica and LouisianaCited by:   The Economy and Material Culture of Slaves: Goods and Chattels on the Sugar Plantations of Jamaica and Louisiana.

In many ways the slaves' independent economic endeavours offered a foundation for their domestic and community life, shaping the social structure of slave society and providing a material basis for their distinctive culture. Moreover, the character of the slaves' economy and the modest economic success achieved by black men Cited by: The economy and material culture of slaves: goods and chattels on the sugar plantations of Jamaica and Louisiana.

This pioneering study examines in extensive detail the economies and material cultures that slaves built among themselves in two of the most heavily developed plantation regions in the Americas.

Slavery as an economic institution. A small percentage of slaves were domestic servants, working in a planter's main house as cooks, nursemaids, seamstresses, and coachmen.

An even smaller percentage worked as laborers or craftsmen—carpenters, masons, and blacksmiths. Although many encyclopedias discuss slavery, enslaved blacks, The Economy and Material Culture of Slaves book African American life and culture, none focus on the material world of slaves, such as what they saw; touched; heard; ate, drank, and smoked; wore; worked with and in; used, cultivated, crafted, Reviews: 2.

Slave religion and culture. In much the same way they viewed slave marriage, planters also saw religion as a means of controlling their slaves, and they encouraged it.

Slaves, in a prayer house built on the plantation or at services in their master's nearby church, heard time and again a simple sermon—obey your master and do not steal or lie.

Slavery - Slavery - Slave culture: The institution of slavery usually tried to deny its victims their native cultural identity. Torn out of their own cultural milieus, they were expected to abandon their heritage and to adopt at least part of their enslavers’ culture.

How Slavery Helped Build a World Economy. of African-American Culture by the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library (National Geographic Books. How Slavery Became the Economic Engine of the South.

Slavery was so profitable, it sprouted more millionaires per capita in the Mississippi River valley than anywhere in the nation. With cash crops of tobacco, cotton and sugar cane, America’s southern states became the economic engine of the burgeoning nation.

The overall effect of slavery on the American economy is also arguable with various scholars identifying some positive and some negative elements of the practice. The South did not make the same technological and industrial advancements as the North until after slavery had been abolished, and some scholars consider this to have been an economic.

Author Edward E. Baptist‘s new book, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism, explains how the American economic system benefited from slavery and used the Author: Kenon White.

In all of these instances, slave culture enabled a significant amount of resistance to the plantation economy and created a relatively cohesive slave identity that shaped southern life and relationships between slaves and whites in the colonial era.

Princeton/Stanford Working Papers in Classics Slavery in the Roman economy Version September Walter Scheidel Stanford University Abstract: This paper discusses the location of slavery in the Roman economy.

It deals with the size and distribution of the slave population and the economics of slave labor and offers a. The economy in the south depended on slavery for the cotton growing areas and slave trading. Slavery has played a huge role in the Southern Colonies in developing economical and society choices in the ss.

Southern society mirrored European society in many ways. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. Books & arts from The Economist. You've seen the news, now discover the story. Books, arts and culture Prospero; A kind of freedom “Conjure Women” is a tale of slavery and its aftermath.

The slave economy. This is the currently selected item. Life for enslaved men and women. Early abolition. The Mexican-American War. The Compromise of Practice: Abolition, slavery, and the Compromise of Uncle Tom's Cabin - influence of the Fugitive Slave Act.

Blassingame defended his conclusions at a meeting of the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History and in published a revised and enlarged edition of The Slave Community. Despite criticisms, The Slave Community is a foundational text in the study of the life and culture of slaves in the antebellum : John W.

Blassingame. How slavery became America’s first big business. Historian and author Edward E. Baptist explains how slavery helped the US go from a “colonial economy to.

The culture of the Southern United States, or Southern culture, is a subculture of the United States. The combination of its unique history and the fact that many Southerners maintain—and even nurture—an identity separate from the rest of the country has led to its being the most studied and written-about region of the U.S.This book is a social and intellectual history of slavery and ideas about it in western history.

It is divided into three parts. The first part covers slavery in ancient and medieval times and how practices differed in time and space in western culture.4/5.Slavery proved to be a highly profitable investment that concentrated wealth and power in the hands of the planter class.

The legendary "Old South" was derived from the culture of the Chesapeake Tidewater region and the South Carolina coast.